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November 28, 2012

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Emily Nussbaum

Hi there, Band of Thebes. Actually, Halperin was such a strong element of Alex Ross' excellent essay on the gay rights movement two weeks earlier that it didn't make sense to include his thinking in my piece, especially since I wanted to focus on Murphy's shows, not on the larger gay academic discussion of camp.

Here's Ross' terrific, sweeping essay, in case you missed it: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2012/11/12/121112fa_fact_ross — in it, he specifically mentions the fact that it's odd that David Halperin doesn't address Glee in How To Be Gay.

Either way, thanks for engaging with my young, city ideas! (P.S. I grew up in Westchester, so I'm bilingual.)

Sontag Fan

I'm tired of reading about Sontag's essay on Camp - in her many public appearances in the years before her death (2001-2003) she basically disowned it - and its referenced now in an totally a-historical way mainly by those who read it in an introductory college course and still think its cool.

Camp is NO LONGER an operative adjective or category in the culture! It captured a very specific moment in American culture circa 1963 in the discourses around the emergence of mass culture in magazines like Partisan Review.

And Ryan Murphy is NOT CAMP!

Ryan

I agree that Murphy is camp--for straight audiences. But that's not true camp after all, which was partially a product of the closet and a coded language. Is it even possible to have camp in our assimiliationist gay society now?

Steven Maynard

I'm not sure our faithful blogger reads his comments, for this will be the third time I've told him that it's DAVID not Daniel Halperin.

Leo

Who buys The New Yorker at a newsstand? Maybe someone else should get into century 21. If The New Yorker's problem is generational so is literate society's. We are all ageing and do not all live in Westchester. West? Yes, where the young went and still go to escape that "other coast" elitism, which seems to be still alive and breathing after all these years.

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